Broomhill to Strines; via Stanage Edge and High Neb

This Saturday’s walk was predominantly inspired by the inconsistent nature of rural public transport. We’d planned to walk around the northern arm of Ladybower Reservoir, then on to Strines via Foulstone Moor.The latest online bus timetable for the 274, going from Sheffield to Castleton, via Yorkshire Bridge, suggested that the first bus of the day should arrive at Broomhill around 08:16. At 08:30, it still hadn’t arrived, so my friend Craig and I decided to shake off our reliance on the transport system, and instead walk out to Fox House and see how we felt from there.

Rough route map, courtesy of http://maps.the-hug.net/

Rough route map, courtesy of http://maps.the-hug.net/

We took the usually popular, but mostly deserted path through Endcliffe Park, heading towards Ringinglow Road, then took up the battered bridleway leading to Fox House from close to the Norfolk Arms.

The path at Endcliffe.

The path at Endcliffe.

Looking back towards Sheffield, from Porter Clough.

Looking back towards Sheffield, from Porter Clough.

The further we walked out of the main habitation zone, and the more altitude we achieved, the more the wind picked up and the heavier the fine drizzle became, at one point threatening to soak us through in a similar fashion to that of last week’s fun & games. However we came prepared this time, and changed into our waterproofs on the bridleway passing Lady Canning’s Platation. The mist was pretty thick giving us probably around 50m visibility, and considering we encountered a couple of groups of motocrossers with varying levels of headlight integrity and speed regulation, at times this felt a little dangerous.

Mists at Lady Canning's Plantation.

Mists at Lady Canning’s Plantation.

Arriving at Fox House, we decided to get warm inside whilst we took a look at the map, and decided where to go on from here, which also involved ordering a beer, of which my foul choice tasted like something akin to vinegar. Delicious! Having made up our minds, we grabbed a quick sandwich and headed off along Burbage Moor towards Higger Tor. We descended a short way, to cross Ringinglow/Hathersage Road, making our way to the southern tip of Stanage Edge.

Burbage Rocks, enshrouded in mist.

Burbage Rocks, enshrouded in mist.

Up from the moor to Higger Tor.

Up from the moor towards Higger Tor.

Descending Higger Tor; first views out to Hathersage.

Descending Higger Tor; first views out to Hathersage.

As we approached the edge, it seemed like the cloud was not going to lift and I was quietly disappointed, as one of my main goals of the day was to check out the views over Hathersage and Bamford Moors in order to test my new lens, (which my better half Sarah, and my parents kindly chipped in for it as an early birthday/christmas present!). But fortunately, my disappointment wasn’t to last, as ever-so-slowly most of the mist blew over the edge from the south-west, and the blanket of cloud ascended somewhat, giving us transient peeks at the mist-laden landscape.

Arriving on Stanage; there are people around but not much to see!

Arriving on Stanage; there are people around but not much to see!

You can just about make out Win & Lose Hills.

You can just about make out Win & Lose Hills.

The cloud begins to lift...

The cloud begins to lift…

...and the mists blow over.

…and the mists blow over.

Indeed, once the cloud had lifted, the path along the edge felt liberating and, perhaps being something to do with the proximity and extent of the open moorland on all sides of Stanage, somehow less claustrophobic than the barren edge-walks on Kinder, (the latter feeling hemmed in by the Great Ridge to the south, and the Bleaklow region to the north).

And now further, towards the Kinder Plateau.

And now further, towards the Kinder Plateau.

The cloud lifts properly.

The cloud lifts properly on our descent…

Upon reaching High Neb, we were afforded increasingly clear views out towards the Great Ridge and Kinder Plateau. We then descended onto Moscar Moor, and headed for the Snake Pass for the road to the Strines Inn. On what was our final push to the pub, the weather took a turn for the delightful, with sun and blue skies breaking through properly for the first time all day. Given these turns, we headed for the beer garden, peacocks and all, to enjoy what might be the last of the properly decent weather for some time, (at least according to the weather forecasts).

...and the sun comes out!

…and the sun comes out!

Just in time for a beer!

Just in time for a beer!

The road-walk back to the Snake Pass was lit by the dying sun, and quite a beautiful sunset it was. And to top it off, whilst waiting for the unlikely event that the bus should turn up to take us home, a car pulled up to the bus stop and John, a courier from Barnsley, stopped to offer us a lift into town! If you’re reading this John, thanks a bunch, we owe you a beer! Quite a lovely end to a fulfilling Saturday’s walk.

A beautiful end to the day.

A beautiful end to the day.

Moonrise.

Moonrise.

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6 responses

  1. I use public transport all the time to go walking in the Peak District and find that the service level to areas further south, the Hope Valley and Bakewell areas is fine. I rarely go this far north though because the bus service is limited…even when it shows up.

    05/06/2016 at 09:14

    • Indeed. It’s much more reliable in the height of summer I find.

      05/06/2016 at 10:23

  2. Enjoyed our post. A great way to get out of the city, just start walking. Shame about the bus, reliability, will it come or won’t it, is the one thing that seems to hold more people back from using public transport. Look forward to reading more.

    30/10/2013 at 08:05

    • Hi Paul, thanks for taking a look. Indeed, especially as they’re so infrequent anyway, I wonder how people who actually rely on the service get on!

      30/10/2013 at 09:55

  3. Are you guys from around here, or did you study here, or were you just visiting?

    20/10/2013 at 21:30

  4. oureverydayadventures365

    Beautiful. Takes me back to my walks in the region

    20/10/2013 at 21:05

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