Kinder Plateau, then on to Castleton via Brown Knoll and Rushup Edge

This Saturday myself and a couple of friends, (Craig & James), set out to do the east, west and north edges of the Kinder Plateau, preceding what turned out to be, a longer-than-expected ‘bogtrot’ over Brown Knoll towards Castleton. As Craig’s GPS-capable watch again gave up the ghost, this time as we reached Castleton, the following vaguely-accurate, hand-drawn route from Wikiloc will have to suffice for now. This weekend’s report is a short one and with fewer pictures than usual, as most of the route was covered here a couple of weeks ago.

Route map courtesy of Wikiloc.

Rough route map courtesy of Wikiloc.

The train into Edale was pleasant, with sufficient seating, (more than I can say for several of my train journeys in previous weeks). We arrived in Edale around 09:45, and headed straight for Ringing Roger, taking a north-easterly path almost from the end of the road behind the Nags, (not to be confused with the Nags in Castleton). In doing so, we encountered the beginnings of the Edale Skyline fell race, postponed from March due to excessive snow on the ground, (a terrible excuse if you ask me, but then I’m not a runner). So for the next ten minutes or so we took up a position on top of some rocks just off the path to wait and watch them pass.

Sitting off at Ringing Roger

Sitting off at Ringing Roger

Our route took us east towards Jagger’s Clough, then onwards, following the plateau’s edge to Crookstone Knoll. All the time the wind was picking up, and by the time we reached Seal Stones, it was blowing a full on gale. Our path then followed the trajectory of my previous walk, heading along the northern and western edges of Kinder, until the Pennine Way and Jacob’s Ladder, where I’d previously dropped back down into Edale.

Looking out to Lose & Win Hills from the southern edge of the Kinder plateau.

Looking out to Lose & Win Hills from the southern edge of the Kinder plateau.

A furry friend we helped off the path along the way.

A furry friend we helped off the path along the way.

About to rejoin the Pennine Way, looking out to Kinder Reservoir.

About to rejoin the Pennine Way, looking out to Kinder Reservoir.

Instead though, we continued south, traversing the tussocked, boggy tops across Brown Knoll, (I almost lost the will to live this time round, but I’ll photograph it some day). By this point, each of us was starting to suffer a wee bit and heartily cursed the ground beneath our feet, which for some of the way, had been dug up by the earlier fell race. I’m not sure I know a worse surface to walk on when you’re feet and legs are already so knackered! But we had some semblance of hope in our hearts and minds as, as usual these days, the good old Nags Head in Castleton was our intended destination.

Anyhow, from Brown Knoll, we headed for the bridleway at Rushup Edge, following it then dropping down to the path that took us past the Blue John and Treak Cliff caverns. Whilst an ascent of Mam Tor had been considered earlier in the day, by this time, only the pub was sought after, and only at this point did we drop to a low enough altitude for the wind finally let up. With Craig’s GPS packing in, I make the route to be approximately 18 miles/29 km, though I’d probably add a bit due to the rough-hand nature of my drawn route.

We’re camping next week, in Edale again, but a slightly different kettle of fish perhaps.

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